Okaw Veterinary Clinic

140 W. Sale
Tuscola, IL 61953

(217)253-3221

okawvetclinic.com

   Kitten Care  

Congratulations! You're a cat owner. We hope you and your new kitten will have a wonderful life, full of fun. We are here to answer any questions and to help your cat live a long and healthy life. 

Your new kitten will need to receive a few vaccines to protect him or her from Feline Rhinotrachetis, Calicivirus, Calicivirus VS, Panleukemia and Rabies. The kitten will receive his or her first vaccine between the ages of 6 and 9 weeks. The kitten will continue to receive booster vaccines every 3 weeks until the kitten is 4 months old. Then the kitten can receive the Rabies vaccine. We also can test for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus and Leukemia, and vaccinate again Feline Leukemia. We recommend this test for any kitten born as a stray or "barn kitten", or any cat that will spend time outside with other cats. If you have other cats at home it is a very good idea to make sure your new kitty is not a carrier of these serious diseases.

You will also need to bring in a stool sample from the kitten. We will check to see if the kitten has any intestinal parasites, such as coccidia, roundworms, tapeworms or hookworms. Kittens can be born with some worms, or can be infected by the environment where they live. If your kitten has any worms we will give it medication to kill the worms. Some worms can be transmitted from your kitten to you or your children. We will also check your kitten to see if he or she has ear mites. Kittens and cats will pass these mites between each other by being in close contact or grooming. The mites live in the ear and are microscopic. They cause itching and dark, crusty gunk in the cat's ears. If your kitten has ear mites, we will send you home with medication to kill the ear mites. If your kitten has been in your home for more than a day or two, we will also send home medication for your other pets. The kitten can give your dog or cat these worms and ear mites.

When the cat is 6 months old we can spay or neuter the kitten. We also recommend, if you want to declaw the cat, to do this at the same time. We also recommend microchipping your cat at this time. The microchip will be placed under the cat's skin by the shoulders. If your cat is lost and found by someone, they can take him to a vet or shelter and have the cat scanned for a microchip. The vet or shelter can then call the microchip company, which has your information, and reunite you and your cat. Before surgery, we will draw a sample of blood and run tests to make sure the kitten does not have any liver or kidney problems. Anesthesia medications are removed by the liver and kidney, so we want to make sure they are working properly. If the kitten does have a problem, we may prescribe medicine or a new food and recheck your kitten in about a month.

Litter training is usually easy for kittens and cats. Cats, in general, are very clean animals. They groom themselves and bury their stool and urine. Purchase a shallow litter box your kitten can jump into. If your kitten is less than 8 weeks old, you may need to use a shallow cake pan for a few weeks until the kitten can jump into the litter box. Fill with 1-2 inches of litter. Clean the litter box at least once a day. Change the litter every couple weeks. If you have more than one cat, you will need to have more than one litter box. The rule for litter boxes in multi-cat homes is to have one box for each cat plus one more. The litter boxes should be put in different rooms. If the boxes are too close, some of your cats may not want to use the boxes because they can smell the other cats' urine and stool. If the kitten does pee or poop outside the litter box, do not scold the kitten. Clean the urine or stooled area with an enzymatic cleaner such as, Simple Solution, which you can purchase at a pet store. Feeding your kitten a high quality diet, such as Hills or Iams, also helps with litter box use. A low quality diet contains many fillers that the cat cannot digest and therefore has to be pooped out.

If you have any questions about kitten or cat care, please give us a call or send an email.

 

                



Puppy Care  


Congratulations! You're a dog owner. We hope you and your new puppy will have a wonderful life, full of fun. We are here answer any questions and to help your dog live a long and healthy life. 

Your new puppy will need to receive a few vaccines to protect him or her from Distemper, Adenovirus, Coronavirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza and Rabies. The puppy will receive his or her first vaccine between the ages of 6 and 9 weeks, usually at 8 weeks. The puppy will continue to receive booster vaccines every 3 weeks until he or she is 4 months old. Then the puppy can receive the Rabies vaccine. The puppy will also be registered with the county when the rabies vaccine is given. 

You will also need to bring in a stool sample from the puppy. We will check to see if the puppy has any intestinal parasites, such as coccidia, roundworms, tapeworms, whipworms or hookworms. Puppies can be born with some worms, or can be infected by the environment where they live. If your puppy has any worms we will give it medication to kill the worms. Some worms can be transmitted from your puppy to you or your children. We will also check your puppy to see if he or she has ear mites. Puppies and dogs will pass these mites between each other by being in close contact. The mites live in the ear and are microscopic. They cause itching and dark, crusty gunk in the dog's ears. If your puppy has ear mites, we will send you home with medication to kill the ear mites. If your puppy has been in your home for more than a day or two, we will also send home medication for your other pets. The puppy can give your dog or cat these worms and ear mites.

When the puppy is 6 months old we can spay or neuter the puppy. We recommend microchipping your puppy at this time. The microchip will be placed under the dog's skin by the shoulders. If your dog is lost and found by someone, they can take him to a vet or shelter and have the dog scanned for a microchip. The vet or shelter can then call the microchip company, which has your information, and reunite you and your dog. Before surgery, we will draw a sample of blood and run tests to make sure the puppy does not have any liver or kidney problems. Anesthesia medications are removed by the liver and kidney, so we want to make sure they are working properly. If the puppy does have a problem, we may prescribe medicine or a new food and recheck your puppy in about a month. We will also check your puppy for heartworm disease at this time. We can use the same sample of blood to check for heartworm disease. If your puppy has heartworm disease, we will not do surgery. We will hospitalize the puppy for a couple days and give two injections of a medication to kill the worms that are living in the heart. After the injections, the puppy will need to stay in a kennel or very small room for a week. If the puppy gets too excited and runs around, the worms can clump together and form a clot that could kill the puppy.

House training a puppy should start as soon as you get the puppy. Everyone in the family needs to work together to train the puppy and be consistant. The puppy should go outside after he or she eats, plays or sleeps. Feeding a puppy 2-3 meals a day at specific times will help you know when the puppy needs to go out. Also, feed a high quality diet, such as Hills or Iams. Lower quality foods contain many fillers that a dog cannot digest, so they must poop them out. A puppy can hold his or her urine for a short amount of time. The rule is one hour for the age of the pup in months. So if you have a puppy that is 8 weeks old (or 2 months), you can only expect the puppy to be able to hold his or her urine for two hours. When you are away you should confine the puppy in a kennel or small room. This will help prevent the puppy from getting into things and help control soiling mistakes in the house. Dogs, in general, do not want to dirty where they sleep. The confined puppy is more likely to hold his or her urine and poop, than a puppy in a larger room. However, don't keep the puppy confined beyond the amount of time he or she can hold urine. If you will be gone longer, ask a neighbor to let the dog out, or provide a potty pad in a larger crate, so the dog can move away from the urine or stool. As you start potty training, take the puppy out frequently so he or she has many chances to do it right. Take him or her out every half hour or so. When you take your puppy outside, make sure the puppy is on a leash and take a poop bag and a few small treats with you. Take your puppy to a specific area of the yard. Say "Potty" or another similar cue word when the puppy is sniffing the ground. When your puppy is peeing or pooping, say "Good Potty" in a non excited tone. When the puppy is finished give a treat and give your puppy lavish praising. Then pick up the poop. A new thought in behavior medicine, suggests that calling attention to the poop and picking it up makes the dog feel that the poop is important and to continue to poop for you outside. Continue using the cue word every time you go out, even as the puppy grows into adulthood. The cue will help the dog focus on what he or she is supposed to do. If the puppy has an accident in the house, do not scold the puppy. If you catch the dog pooping or pottying in the house, loudly clap your hands to startle the dog. Then pick him or her up and take the puppy outside for a chance to do it right. If you do not catch the dog in the act, just clean up the mess. Do not let your dog see you cleaning the mess in the house. Again, the theory states, you paying attention to the mess makes the dog want to poop again in that area. You don't want the puppy to poop in the house. Clean the urine or stooled area with an enzymatic cleaner such as, Simple Solution, which you can purchase at a pet store. If the puppy continues to soil in the house daily please schedule an appointment to make sure your puppy does not have a health problem. We can also give you some more tips on house training. The more times a dog pees or poops on a surface,such as carpeting, the more the dog thinks that this surface is a toilet area.

If you have any questions about kitten or cat care, please give us a call or send an email.